FAQ

 Do you ship?

 At this time we do not ship our puppies, whether you are looking for ground transport or air transportation. We require all of our puppies to be picked up in person, this allows us to not only meet you but discuss any questions you may have and also teach you how to post ears. 

 Do you breed for colour?

 The simple answer is no, we do not breed for specific colours. With that being said, we also do not avoid colours that are part of the breed standard. We will not breed for albinos or any other colours that are not allowed within the AKC breed standard for either Dobermans or MBT's. We also do NOT breed specifically to produce dilute, but we also will not avoid a breeding that is perfect for us just because it may produce dilutes. 

 Do you sell full registration?

Yes, we do. However, our full registration contracts are extensive and full registration does not mean you have breeding rights. This is really something best discussed with us. Most of our puppies are sold on limited registration with a spay and neuter contract. 

 Dews, docking, and cropping?

 With our MBT's, they all have their dew claws removed at 3-5 days of age. Our Doberman puppies all have their dew claws removed and tails docked at 3-5 days of age. We are not opposed to natural tails, however at this time it is not an option we can offer. We crop all of our Doberman puppies and make sure their ears are fully healed before they go home with their new family. We will at times allow a pet puppy to go home with natural ears, granted the owners understand the ears need to be taped down to lay correctly. 

Do you have DCM in your lines?

 Yes, everyone does. There is no such thing as DCM free bloodlines. This does not mean that we have DCM raging in our lines. We do our best to avoid pedigrees with early death DCM and Cancer. DCM1 (PKD4) and DCM2 genetic markers, at this time, do not mean that your dog will end up with DCM. There currently is very little correlation between between the markers and the actual onset of DCM. We will keep striving to do what we can to avoid DCM deaths by studying pedigrees and health as well as incorporating genetic diversity.